Comments on: Puppy Linux 4.0 on a Dell Inspiron 1150 Review http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89 Linux and Tech Stuff Mon, 26 May 2008 03:28:18 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.2.2 By: Jeff http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-358 Jeff Thu, 22 May 2008 23:27:25 +0000 http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-358 I've been on my hindquarters yipping gleefully about Puppy for some years, now. This distro allowed me to use and demonstrate my Dell P-133 laptop to low-income folk looking for a way to have cheap access to useable technology. Also, it fueled major interest in some old N.I.C. thin clients we received. Using 64MB of RAM and Puppy-in-RAM, we kept dozens of them out of landfill and into the hands of geeks and po' folk with access to DSL network-connections. As always, and again I keep saying: "Puppy Rocks" ! I’ve been on my hindquarters yipping gleefully about Puppy for some years, now. This distro allowed me to use and demonstrate my Dell P-133 laptop to low-income folk looking for a way to have cheap access to useable technology. Also, it fueled major interest in some old N.I.C. thin clients we received. Using
64MB of RAM and Puppy-in-RAM, we kept dozens of them out of landfill and into the hands of geeks and po’ folk with access to DSL network-connections. As always, and again I keep saying: “Puppy Rocks” !

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By: David http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-356 David Thu, 22 May 2008 15:49:20 +0000 http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-356 Thanks disciple for correction on Java games. I meant to say Flash videos and games were working out of the box. I fixed the post to correct the mistake I made. I also tried to run Mplayer from the command line. You were right, it works without any problems so it is something with JWM not working right. Thanks disciple for correction on Java games. I meant to say Flash videos and games were working out of the box. I fixed the post to correct the mistake I made. I also tried to run Mplayer from the command line. You were right, it works without any problems so it is something with JWM not working right.

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By: Guy http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-355 Guy Thu, 22 May 2008 15:13:03 +0000 http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-355 I've found remastering the CD really easy. The dialogs are pretty much self-explanatory. Just be aware that any changes to the desktop may require manually copying files from the old to the new root directory when offered. You are also offered the chance to edit the new /etc. Puppy even burns the CD. I had a remastered CD with the apps I wanted in very little time. I needed the old GKdial as my ISP doesn't like the current puppy dialler & British English support for Abiword. I found it easy to do & am feeling adventurous, currently downloading the SDK to try some more advanced modifications. I give Puppy 20 out of 10 ;0) I’ve found remastering the CD really easy. The dialogs are pretty much self-explanatory. Just be aware that any changes to the desktop may require manually copying files from the old to the new root directory when offered. You are also offered the chance to edit the new /etc. Puppy even burns the CD.

I had a remastered CD with the apps I wanted in very little time. I needed the old GKdial as my ISP doesn’t like the current puppy dialler & British English support for Abiword. I found it easy to do & am feeling adventurous, currently downloading the SDK to try some more advanced modifications.

I give Puppy 20 out of 10 ;0)

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By: tom http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-352 tom Thu, 22 May 2008 00:32:50 +0000 http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-352 It's been a while since I looked at Puppy and at the time security would have been a concern for some users. In the past, Puppy was designed so that the user ran it as root, with full privileges. Is this still the case? If there is a mechanism for running as an unprivileged user, is that mechanism easily accessible, or does it require CLI commands? Is there a user friendly tool included in the ISO for turning services off and on? It’s been a while since I looked at Puppy and at the time security would have been a concern for some users. In the past, Puppy was designed so that the user ran it as root, with full privileges. Is this still the case?

If there is a mechanism for running as an unprivileged user, is that mechanism easily accessible, or does it require CLI commands?

Is there a user friendly tool included in the ISO for turning services off and on?

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By: disciple http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-350 disciple Wed, 21 May 2008 21:57:38 +0000 http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-350 Java games? Maybe Flash games. Java is about the only thing Puppy actually doesn't do out of the box. Mplayer should work if you start it from a terminal or the "run" program, or from clicking on it in ROX. It seems to require some trickiness in the launch script and/or the menu item to get Mplayer to start properly from the JWM menu, so maybe Barry didn't know this when he made that official package. Java games? Maybe Flash games. Java is about the only thing Puppy actually doesn’t do out of the box.
Mplayer should work if you start it from a terminal or the “run” program, or from clicking on it in ROX. It seems to require some trickiness in the launch script and/or the menu item to get Mplayer to start properly from the JWM menu, so maybe Barry didn’t know this when he made that official package.

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By: klhrevolution http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-349 klhrevolution Wed, 21 May 2008 21:17:48 +0000 http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-349 Another podcast to add to your list if you enjoy is linuxoutlaws.com Another podcast to add to your list if you enjoy is linuxoutlaws.com

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By: Eyes-Only http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-347 Eyes-Only Wed, 21 May 2008 18:23:42 +0000 http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-347 Hi David! Thanks for giving Puppy 4.0 "Dingo" a try and doing such a great, thorough, and what I consider to be, impartial review of a Linux OS that many of us have come to love and admire---even as our default installed everyday system. I happen to have 5 distros installed upon my computer (I both test and love to play as I have free time galore), I start and finish my day with Puppy. Lately it's been "Dingo". You think it's fast in memory? A hard drive install is just outrageous! :) Interesting what you had mentioned though about MPlayer. I haven't encountered that specific problem myself, however, I tend to lean more towards Xine for my DVDs David and I do believe that you'll find that programme in the Puppy 4.0 repository as well along with the libfiles needed. Xine is the player my grandson and I prefer the most. He's been using Puppy since he was 4. A "Linux for all ages" you could say? ;) Once again, thank you for your time and your great review David! Eyes-Only "L'Peau-Rouge" Hi David!

Thanks for giving Puppy 4.0 “Dingo” a try and doing such a great, thorough, and what I consider to be, impartial review of a Linux OS that many of us have come to love and admire—even as our default installed everyday system. I happen to have 5 distros installed upon my computer (I both test and love to play as I have free time galore), I start and finish my day with Puppy. Lately it’s been “Dingo”. You think it’s fast in memory? A hard drive install is just outrageous! :)

Interesting what you had mentioned though about MPlayer. I haven’t encountered that specific problem myself, however, I tend to lean more towards Xine for my DVDs David and I do believe that you’ll find that programme in the Puppy 4.0 repository as well along with the libfiles needed. Xine is the player my grandson and I prefer the most. He’s been using Puppy since he was 4. A “Linux for all ages” you could say? ;)

Once again, thank you for your time and your great review David!

Eyes-Only
“L’Peau-Rouge”

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By: Daniele Tagliabue http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-346 Daniele Tagliabue Wed, 21 May 2008 17:12:57 +0000 http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-346 Good review, David. I love Puppy a lot though my desktop box has always been Kubuntu and/or Linux Mint. I agree with whom somewhere else said the Puppy is simply a labour of love... Anyway, I also managed to install it on my 2GB USB key, though I had to choose the "Superfloppy" method. I think it works really great, though for machines with older BIOS the USB installation is not an option. I'm so grateful to Barry Kauler for his superb achievement I'm already looking forward to Puppy's next release... Ten thumbs up!! Daniele Good review, David.
I love Puppy a lot though my desktop box has always been Kubuntu and/or Linux Mint.
I agree with whom somewhere else said the Puppy is simply a labour of love…
Anyway, I also managed to install it on my 2GB USB key, though I had to choose the “Superfloppy” method.
I think it works really great, though for machines with older BIOS the USB installation is not an option.

I’m so grateful to Barry Kauler for his superb achievement
I’m already looking forward to Puppy’s next release…

Ten thumbs up!!
Daniele

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By: fstephens http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-345 fstephens Wed, 21 May 2008 17:11:59 +0000 http://www.penguinway.net/?p=89#comment-345 I've always found Puppy interesting, but each time I test it I come away thinking it a little... crude. Not that it doesn't work well enough, and it has interesting features like saving your settings and data back to the CD, but it just has an amateurish feel to it. Most modern live CD's will automatically configure and start your network interface for instance, but in puppy you have to deal with a somewhat confusing setup utility before you can get online. Startup also requires you to choose a keymap, and Xorg or vesa (Xorg completly locks up for me in a virtual machine). Because of this and the cluttered menus with too many choices (I know, ironic for an 87MB distro) of non-standard utilities and applications, I would hesitate to recommend it to a novice Linux user. I also think the dialogs contribute to this less than professional "feel". (Too many exclamation points!! Sorry Barry). Of course, maybe this is part of the charm of Puppy - not being like the slick commercial distros. In any case I don't mean to diminish the accomplishment of the development team. Puppy is a nice piece of work, and a possible candidate for use on minimal hardware. I like it well enough that I may install it on an old laptop with 600Mhz Celeron and 256MB RAM. But then, Xubuntu runs quite well on this machine and is very slick, as well as being built on Debian, which I prefer to a built from scratch distro. I’ve always found Puppy interesting, but each time I test it I come away thinking it a little… crude. Not that it doesn’t work well enough, and it has interesting features like saving your settings and data back to the CD, but it just has an amateurish feel to it. Most modern live CD’s will automatically configure and start your network interface for instance, but in puppy you have to deal with a somewhat confusing setup utility before you can get online. Startup also requires you to choose a keymap, and Xorg or vesa (Xorg completly locks up for me in a virtual machine). Because of this and the cluttered menus with too many choices (I know, ironic for an 87MB distro) of non-standard utilities and applications, I would hesitate to recommend it to a novice Linux user.

I also think the dialogs contribute to this less than professional “feel”. (Too many exclamation points!! Sorry Barry). Of course, maybe this is part of the charm of Puppy - not being like the slick commercial distros. In any case I don’t mean to diminish the accomplishment of the development team. Puppy is a nice piece of work, and a possible candidate for use on minimal hardware. I like it well enough that I may install it on an old laptop with 600Mhz Celeron and 256MB RAM. But then, Xubuntu runs quite well on this machine and is very slick, as well as being built on Debian, which I prefer to a built from scratch distro.

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